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Changing Exhibits

September 1 - December 20, 2018

America's Wolves: From Tragedy to Triumph

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Upcoming Events

Sat Sep 22 @ 8:00pm - 09:30pm
Historic Downtown Mount Airy Ghost Tours
Wed Sep 26 @ 8:00pm - 09:30pm
Special added Ghost Tours in September!
Thu Sep 27 @ 3:30pm - 04:30pm
Tar Heel Junior Historians Introductory Meeting

Who We Are

 

Mount Airy Museum of Regional History

IMG_8201_-_Copy_606x640 Ours is an all American story - typical of how communities grew up all across our great nation. While our story takes place in the back country of northwestern North Carolina at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, it is likely to bear many similarities to the development of crossroads, towns, and cities throughout America.

It had taken little more than 100 years for the corridors along the coastline of this still-new continent to overflow. As tensions grew and conflicts flared, the pioneer spirit set in. Families literally packed up everything they owned and headed into the unknown-searching for the "promised land."

Mission Statement:

The Purpose of the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History is to  Collect, Preserve and Interpret the Natural, Historic, and Artistic Heritage of the Region

                                                                      Adopted by the Board of Directors   October 9, 1995


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Mount Airy Museum Of Regional History

Museum event honors King’s legacy

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With temperatures in the 20s and a stiff north wind, Saturday night offered less-than-optimum conditions for a community gathering — but this didn’t stop more than 125 people from honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  “When you see people come out when it’s cold — the weather is not inviting — I think it shows people value what’s important,” said Cheryl “Yellow Fawn” Scott, co-director of a 13th-annual King tribute event.

The program, “In the Spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. — Surry Countians Continuing the Dream,” was held at Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, playing to a packed house. “It is always a tremendous honor to see this many folks come out for this program,” museum Executive Director Matt Edwards said of what is one of the facility’s more well-attended events each year. “It is a testament to Dr. King’s legacy and the work of our local volunteers.”

The ensuing program highlighted the fact that while he was felled by an assassin’s bullet in 1968, King’s dream of equality for all continues to live on in the hearts of folks here and elsewhere. This was accomplished Saturday night through musical selections such as “This Little Light of Mind,” “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” “Never Have to be Alone” and others; prayer; creative interpretations; candle lightings in Dr. King’s memory; and special remarks about the impression his incredible life made on America.

King entered the Baptist ministry in the late 1940s and was caught up in the civil rights struggle of the 1950s, becoming the most-visible activist and leader in the movement while relying on tactics of non-violence and civil disobedience. He campaigned against inequality throughout the South, including leading the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott. One of the key moments of his civil rights icon’s career came in 1963 when he helped organize a march on Washington, where he delivered his landmark “I Have a Dream” speech.

Terri Ingalls, a local storyteller who was one of the speakers on Saturday night’s program, recalled that historic event that occurred while she was coming of age in a nearby state. “I was deeply aware of segregation — I grew up in South Carolina,” Ingalls told the audience. “I saw it daily, and I knew it was wrong.” Ingalls watched televised coverage of the Washington event, admittedly because folk music performers she wanted to see were there, including Joan Baez and Peter, Paul and Mary. But Ingalls found herself captivated by King’s words during his historic speech, when he outlined his “dream” of people of all colors living in harmony. Also, King expressed the hope that “my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” “And in the end I sat stunned,” Ingalls said of hearing King’s message. “I was surprised to find my face awash with tears when it was done.”

Another profound segment of Saturday night’s program occurred when Scott detailed the history of martyrs in the civil rights struggle, both black and white, who fell victim to bombings and other acts of violence during the turbulent era. The weapon of love eventually overcame those of hate, such as bombs and guns, Scott said.

A key goal of Saturday’s event involved emphasizing how the lessons espoused by King continue to be exemplified by the lives of folks in Surry County. Special recognition was given to two local families illustrating the value of religion and education, the Posey and Betty Reynolds family, which included 17 children, five of whom survive today, and that of Luther and Willie Rawley. Members of those families have made a mark in such fields as industry, business, engineering, criminal justice and others.

Local youths also were recognized Saturday and two adults were announced as Dr. Martin King Jr. honorees, James Dalton and Col. Don Belle. While he received that special honor Saturday night, Belle said he regularly attends the King tribute events at the museum for one basic reason: “We love this country and we love the many things that Dr. King and the people who were with him have accomplished — black and white.”

MLK program to focus on Surry County

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A program to be presented at Mount Airy Museum of Regional History on Jan. 13 in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day will focus on Surry County and how the spirit of King’s teaching, legacy and life can influence the journey of people in the local community to come together. The program, “In the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Surry Countians Continuing the Dream,” is jointly sponsored by the National Association of University Women, Mount Airy/Surry County branch, and the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History.

“It has been an absolute joy to be involved with this program,” said Cheryl Yellow Fawn Scott, co-director of the event, who has been involved from the beginning. “It is a way to come together, to highlight the positive and instill hope in our community,” adding that the event has grown in its 14-year history. Scott added she was particularly pleased that the event has always been multi-racial, both in attendance and participation. “Last year we had about 100 people,” said co-director LaDonna McCarther, who has also been involved from day one. “Poor Matt had to move some chairs,” referring to Matt Edwards, executive director of the museum. Two people have been named as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. honorees for their life, and the way they have impacted others: Col. Donald Belle and James Dalton. The recipient of the 2018 Dreamer Award will be announced during the program.

The 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s death will be recognized during a candle-lighting ceremony with one of the candles being lit to illuminate his last dream, the Poor People’s Campaign, a campaign for social justice and economic equality. As part of the Surry County focus, recognition will be made of some Surry County families. “African-American families who have been here for generations,” said Scott, adding that one of the families to be recognized is the Posey Reynolds family. Two storytellers will be on hand; Terri Ingalls will recite “Dream to Dream” and Rene Andrews, a storyteller from Winston-Salem, will tell a story for the children present. Youth will be recognized for their achievements, which can be academic, artistic, or the way they live their life as goodwill ambassadors, showing compassion, hope and excellence of any kind. The evening will include several musical performances, including duets by Emma Davis and Ariel Love, and by Teresa Martin and Maggie Lowe. Roxanne Beamer will return to sing again this year, Bob Chilton, will reprise “Mary, Did You Know?” and the Aaron McCarther family, parents and children, will sing. “We’re excited to have them,” said Scott of the scheduled performers. Marie Nicholson will close out the program with a recitation of the Maya Angelou poem, “Still I rise.”

“In the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Surry Countians Continuing the Dream” will be presented at Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, 301 N. Main St., Mount Airy, on Saturday, Jan. 13 at 7 p.m. The event is open to the public, free of charge.

The badge is back, more events planned

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“We’ll just have to wait and see,” said Matt Edwards. The executive director of Mount Airy Museum of Regional History speaking about the possibility of big changes in store for Mount Airy’s fourth New Year’s Eve badge drop in the museum courtyard. Edwards was less cagey about fundraising events planned for the early part of the evening. A three-tiered menu of events is planned, available as a package or à la carte.

The top-tier full package starts with a three-course dinner at Old North State Winery, with a special New Year’s Eve menu by chef Chris Wishart with seatings at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m., followed by special activities at the museum, culminating with a champagne toast for the midnight badge drop. The middle-tier foregoes the dinner, allowing guests to enjoy the museum activities at a reduced cost, and the final tier is the badge drop which is offered to the community free of charge. “We’re excited to have activities in our space,” said Edwards of the museum plans, which are a departure from past years, when dinner and the badge drop book-ended the evening, but left a hole in the center. This year activities are planned for both children and adults.  “It will be an enjoyable way to fill the time between dinner service and midnight for people who are not necessarily looking for a super-raucous party night,” said Edwards. “And folks who are unfamiliar with our facility can experience it in a fun way.”

“Kids New Year” is from 6 to 8 p.m. and will offer a fun place for the kids while their adults enjoy the early seating at Old North State, or dinner elsewhere if they go à la carte. The two hours of fun will count down to a mock-midnight at 8 p.m. “We’re thinking along ‘It’s 5 o’clock somewhere’ lines,” said Edwards. “And at 8 p.m., it’s midnight in the Azores, so the kids will celebrate New Year’s Eve in the Azores. It will let kids who don’t stay up until midnight have a chance to be part of the fun.”

“21+ New Years at the Museum” is from 9 p.m. until midnight will give adults time for some fun stuff while waiting to ring in the new year. There will be live music with Brian Gray and Raven Drums on the third floor of the museum. Along with a cash bar, there will be a trivia night station, an adult craft station, a storytelling station, custom wine glasses and champagne toast at midnight.

Live music will begin in the museum’s courtyard at 11 p.m. with “Going Dutch,” who will play until the midnight badge drop. “Going Dutch” is a local band which played often in the area while in high school, according to Edwards, but after going away to college, get together during their Christmas break to play.

As far as possible changes, upgrades and technological improvements to the badge drop itself, Edwards said that is totally in the hands of Mark Brown, who has complete creative license over the event. “He’s been dabbling with some things,” said Edwards, still being cagey. Finally Edwards came clean and spilled, “Mark wants to completely lighten the weight of the badge, so he can lift it with a drone. But it probably won’t be this year.”

Mayberry could be barreling headlong toward a collision with 21st-century technology in 2018.

Tickets for the full evening are $75 each and include dinner, admission for one for activities at the museum and a champagne toast at midnight. “Kids New Year” is 6-8 p.m. and “21+ New Years at the Museum” is 9 p.m.-midnight. Tickets for both are $25 each. Badge drop in the courtyard is free to the public.

The Mount Airy Museum of Regional History is located at 301 N. Main St., Mount Airy, NC. Old North State Winery is across the roadway at 308 N. Main St. Tickets can be purchased at the museum or by calling 336-789-9463.

Museum event morphs and masks!

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It’s not a costume party,” Matt Edwards, executive director of Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, was quick to point out as he spoke of the museum’s replacement for their popular “Casino Royale” fundraising event.

To put it in old movie terms, the museum is going less James Bond and more Cary Grant and Grace Kelly.

Last year, Edwards said he learned that the Casino Royale event “operated in a very gray area legally. It was pretty much black.”

After consulting with a number of lawyers and district attorneys, the museum board felt a casino event was not something with which they could move forward. It turns out, under North Carolina law, possession of the gaming tables and equipment used in casino nights are illegal to own, even if they are used for charity events.

Edwards said things looked up for a few minutes when a bill came before the NC legislature to allow non-profits to legally hold gaming fundraisers like the ones the museum has held in the past. But, just as it has done every two or three years for the past 25 years, said Edwards, it petered out and died in committee.

So the museum revamped its theme, and after considering a few things, decided on the classic dinner-dance model, and to tie in to the spirit of the season, made it a masked ball. Call it what you will, masquerade ball, masked ball, bal masque, it’s a black-tie-optional dinner/dance where guests wear masks.

Guests can make or purchase masks as extravagant — or not — as they wish.

“And we are happy to provide masks” for guests who don’t want to get into all that, Edwards said.

Will there be a grand unmasking at midnight? “No,” laughed Edwards. “Our crowd won’t make it to midnight.” And indeed the event is scheduled for 6:30 to 11 p.m.

Edwards said that when he came on board with the museum in 2009, the old-school black tie galas were starting to lose steam. The world had become a more casual place and there was less interest in dressing up than there had been before.

“The cost of putting them on exceeded profitability,” said Edwards. He is hoping this event will be heavily sponsored, with sponsorships still coming in.

The Casino Royale was a fresh angle for fundraising, but as it is no longer available, Edwards thought it was a good time to revisit the classic, especially with the added twist of a masquerade.

It’s an important decision, as the fall fundraising event funds about 15% of the museum’s overall budget for the year and is critical in funding day to day operations at the museum. Unlike most non-profits, the museum is on a calendar fiscal year and “this event is ‘make or break’ for us to end the year in a good place,” said Edwards. “And then we jump on that roller coaster all over again.”

Night For the Museum Masquerade Ball is Friday, from 6:30 – 11:30 p.m. at Cross Creek Country Club, 1129 Greenhill Road, Mount Airy. There will be food, music by Continental Divide featuring 2016 Carolina Beach Music Hall of Fame inductee Gene Pharr, a draw-down grand prize of $6,000 cash, and five periodic prizes of $100 and a silent/live auction featuring items such as vacation home rentals, sports equipment and artwork.

Tickets are $65 per person and draw-down tickets are $100. A couples package is available for $200 which includes two event tickets and one draw-down ticket.

For tickets or further information, call the museum at 336-786-4478 or contact a museum board member.

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